diversitydatakids.org: quality of life and diversity data on families
The Heller School For Social Policty And Management The Heller School For Social Policy and Management Brandeis University

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In this webinar called “Using diversitydatakids.org in the Classroom,” learn how to integrate the wealth of data, visualizations and child wellbeing measures from diversitydatakids.org into a variety of undergraduate and graduate courses in sociology, social work, policy, demography, public health and education. Hosted by the Programs in Population Sciences (PiPS, SSDAN).



Watch the webinar here and access the PDF of the slides here.

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Comprehensive new indicators, rankings, maps and data visualizations allow users to compare the neighborhood environments of children by race/ethnicity, age, and poverty status along 19 socioeconomic, housing, and demographic dimensions in metropolitan areas and the 100 largest cities. 

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Racial/Ethnic Inequities in Neighborhood Availability of Head Start Data-For-Action Fact Sheet May 2, 2017

Early childhood experiences have lasting impacts on child health and wellbeing, making Head Start a crucial support for poor and low-income children. Large shares of children in poverty are not served by the program, and participation rates of poor children differ by race/ethnicity. Research has found that having a Head Start center in their immediate neighborhood promotes participation for some groups of children (including immigrant and Hispanic children). New data show that less than one-third of preschool aged children living in poverty have an available Head Start center in their neighborhood. Adjusting for the number of poor young children in a neighborhood (potential demand for Head Start), we see significant racial/ethnic inequities in Head Start neighborhood availability. 

Find out how race, ethnicity, and location influence children's access to early childhood education in this webinar featuring research from diversitydatakids.org and the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP). The webinar examines neighborhood- and state-level access to Head Start and Child Care by race, ethnicity, and nativity. Policy implications of this research are also explored, with particular focus on for Hispanic and immigrant children and families.

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Making Leave Affordable Data-For-Action Fact Sheet May 31, 2017

Over the life course, many workers will need to take family and medical leave to care for their own or a close family member's serious medical condition. Research has found that a primary barrier workers face in taking unpaid family and medical leave is financial cost. This one-pager explores how paid family and medical leave policy can reduce affordability barriers to leave.

Federal Medicaid Eligibility by Child Race/Ethnicity Under the Affordable Care Act and Proposed Repeal Indicators, Data-for-Equity Policy Brief May 30, 2017

The purpose of this analysis is to provide an overview of the number and share of school age children estimated to meet federal minimum eligibility levels for Medicaid under the current income thresholds defined by the Affordable Care Act (ACA), and under revised (lower) thresholds proposed as part of the repeal of the ACA. The analysis considers the implications for school age children overall, and for school age children of different racial/ethnic groups.


Please explore the diversitydatakids.org companion indicators available for the US, all 50 states and DC.

How Can Family & Medical Leave Affect Economic Security? A Snapshot of the Economic Consequences of Unpaid vs. Paid Family and Medical Leave Policies for U.S. Working Age Adults A Data-for-Policy Fact Sheet April 4, 2017

The purpose of this analysis is to estimate the economic consequences of unpaid vs. paid leave for employed working age adults in the event that they needed to take leave from work due to the birth or adoption of a child or their own or a family member's serious medical condition. We assume that they were unable to access any paid leave benefits from other sources (e.g., employers, state policies). These estimates are presented for two scenarios: (1) unpaid leave and (2) paid leave insurance offered under the FAMILY Act.

Asians are more concentrated in the highest-opportunity neighborhoods of many U.S. metro areas than are any other racial group, including whites. But Asian racial subgroups are extraordinarily diverse, and these subgroups are equally diverse in their distribution across neighborhoods of differing opportunity levels. Explore this diversity for almost two dozen Asian subgroups as well as for Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders across the 100 largest metro areas with new indicators and visualizations

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Explore interactive visualizations based on diversitydatakids.org indicators covering topics such as the the Child Opportunity Index, the characteristics of neighborhoods where children of different race/ethnicity and income levels live, the Family and Medical Leave Act, and linguistic isolation.

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Federal Medicaid Eligibility by Child Race/Ethnicity Under the Affordable Care Act and Proposed Repeal Indicators, Data-for-Equity Policy Brief May 30, 2017

The purpose of this analysis is to provide an overview of the number and share of school age children estimated to meet federal minimum eligibility levels for Medicaid under the current income thresholds defined by the Affordable Care Act (ACA), and under revised (lower) thresholds proposed as part of the repeal of the ACA. The analysis considers the implications for school age children overall, and for school age children of different racial/ethnic groups.


Please explore the diversitydatakids.org companion indicators available for the US, all 50 states and DC.

Paid leave advocates have been asking for FMLA data at the state level for years, and now it's here! In collaboration with the National Partnership for Women & Families, diversitydatakids.org researchers Pamela Joshi and Alison Earle show paid leave advocates how to use this new dataset and the accompanying tools to find, download and display FMLA access and affordability data for workers categorized by parental status, race/ethnicity, gender and nativity.

Here's a preview: In Connecticut, where a state-level paid leave fight is ongoing, only 40.6% of working adults are estimated to be eligible for and able to afford unpaid FMLA leave. In Idaho, where local or state action is much further off, that number is even lower - just 28.6% - and lower still for Latino/a working adults.

Don't miss the opportunity to learn more about these new family and medical leave indicators and the ways advocates can leverage this critical data to build a more compelling understanding about the need for paid leave programs. 

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Hispanic National Origin and Neighborhoods of Opportunity Indicators, Visualization October 17, 2016

As a whole, Hispanics are disproportionately concentrated in the lowest-opportunity neighborhoods in U.S. metro areas.  However, reflecting this ethnic group’s diversity, there is great variation by national origin in their distribution across different levels of neighborhood opportunity. Explore Hispanic diversity in terms of access to neighborhoods of opportunity for two dozen Hispanic-origin subgroups across the 100 largest metro areas with new indicators and visualizations.

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In this webinar called “Using diversitydatakids.org in the Classroom,” learn how to incorporate the wealth of data, visualizations and child wellbeing measures from diversitydatakids.org into a variety of undergraduate and graduate courses in sociology, social work, policy, demography, public health and education. Hosted by Hosted by Programs in Population Sciences (PiPS, SSDAN).


Watch the webinar here and access the PDF of the slides here.

 

Read More

Asians are more concentrated in the highest-opportunity neighborhoods of many U.S. metro areas than are any other racial group, including whites. But Asian racial subgroups are extraordinarily diverse, and these subgroups are equally diverse in their distribution across neighborhoods of differing opportunity levels. Explore this diversity for almost two dozen Asian subgroups as well as for Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders across the 100 largest metro areas with new indicators and visualizations

Read More
New Report: Measuring and Mapping Neighborhood Opportunity for U.S. Children Report, Data Visualizations September 15, 2016

The Child Opportunity Index: Measuring and Mapping Neighborhood-based Opportunities for U.S. Children explores racial/ethnic inequities in children’s access to neighborhood opportunity in the 100 largest U.S. metro areas, with a focused look at how residential segregation affects these inequities. The report describes the construction, capabilities, and limitations of the Index, with guidance on how to interpret the associated maps and equity measures. It further provides examples of how organizations are using this tool to better understand and improve children’s neighborhood environments and outcomes. Read the report, use the interactive mapping tool to explore neighborhood opportunity in individual metro areas, download one-page snapshots for 25 metros, produce rankings tables, and explore interactive visualizations that summarize patterns of racial/ethnic inequities in access to neighborhood opportunity.

Quality Check: Do young children in U.S. metro areas live in neighborhoods with quality early childhood education? Data-for-Action Fact Sheet March 11, 2014

Quality early childhood education (ECE) helps kids to succeed. While consensus builds around the need to expand quality ECE for all children, one key factor—neighborhood availability—has received little attention. New data highlight a large existing infrastructure of neighborhood ECE upon which to build, but also show that we have a long way to go to achieve quality ECE for all children.

"Politics and inertia have conspired to create this lopsided geography of affordable housing - undercutting the region's best hope for racial and economic integration," finds a major Boston Globe article, "Boundaries to Hope."  Diversitydatakids.org's analysis forms the foundation of the article and its conclusions, using the Child Opportunity Index (COI) to show the distribution of subsidized housing in metro Boston across neighborhoods with different opportunity levels.

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In many cities across the U.S., Black and Hispanic families are most likely to live in areas where opportunity is relatively expensive, while White and Asian families are most likely to live in areas where opportunity is relatively cheaper. View story maps that show how the geography of affordability, opportunity, and race come together in different U.S. metro areas, and that highlight the implications for equitable access to opportunity.

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Researchers at University of San Francisco, California Use Child Opportunity Index User Engagement November 20, 2015

Drs. Nancy Adler, Tom Boyce, Nicki Bush, and other researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) are using the Childhood Opportunity Index to examine associations between neighborhood qualities and the health of kindergarten children in the greater San Francisco area. The team has merged the Index with data collected as part of the Peers and Wellness Study (PAWS) to explore the unique and interactive influence of neighborhood, family, and individual factors on children’s health during early development. Preliminary analyses suggest that neighborhoods that are higher in resources buffer the impact of low parental socioeconomic status on children’s health during the transition to kindergarten. Research will continue to explore environmental factors that affect children’s health and development with the aim of informing prevention and intervention efforts to support children’s healthy development.

Chicago Department of Public Health Use Child Opportunity Index for Healthy Chicago 2.0 User Engagement April 17, 2015

The Chicago Department of Public Health Office of Epidemiology and Public Health Informatics has been using Child Opportunity Index data during the development of the agenda for the Healthy Chicago 2.0, a five-year citywide community health improvement plan. In consultation with diversitydatakids.org researchers, the Healthy Chicago 2.0 team has re-benchmarked the Child Opportunity Index from the Chicago Metro Area to the City of Chicago, and then examined the relationship between the Index and indicators such as life expectancy at birth, teen births, obesity in children, elevated blood lead levels, diabetes-related mortality, diet-related mortality, non-fatal shootings.

Boston Medical Center and Vital Village Network Combine COI with Electronic Medical Records and Crime Data in Boston User Engagement: Presentation March 18, 2015

Dr. Renee Boynton-Jarrett, Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Boston University School of Medicine and Founding Director of the Vital Village Network, is leading a team of physicians and researchers to combine patient medical records and crime data with the Child Opportunity Index in Boston. They are using electronic medical records to develop child health indicators of child obesity, hypertension, and asthma in relation to neighborhood opportunity and violent crime prevalence. 

In Neighborhood Opportunity and Location Affordability for Low-Income Renter Families, recently published in Housing Policy Debate, researchers from diversitydatakids.org and the Kirwan Institute  reveal the difficult trade-offs that low-income renter families face in obtaining affordable housing in higher-opportunity neighborhoods and the particular disadvantages encountered by black and Hispanic families with children.  By combining two unique databases, HUD’s Location Affordability Index and our own Child Opportunity Index we take an unprecedented look at the relationships between affordability, (both in terms of housing and transportation costs) and opportunity at the neighborhood level, across the 100 largest U.S. metro areas.

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Find out how race, ethnicity, and location influence children's access to early childhood education in this webinar featuring research from diversitydatakids.org and the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP). The webinar examines neighborhood- and state-level access to Head Start and Child Care by race, ethnicity, and nativity. Policy implications of this research are also explored, with particular focus on for Hispanic and immigrant children and families.


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Hispanic National Origin and Neighborhoods of Opportunity Indicators, Data Visualization October 17, 2016

Hispanics are disproportionately concentrated in the lowest opportunity neighborhoods in U.S. metro areas. However, reflecting this ethnic group’s diversity, there is great variation by national origin in their distribution across different levels of neighborhood opportunity. Explore Hispanic diversity in terms of access to neighborhoods of opportunity for two dozen Hispanic-origin subgroups across the 100 largest metro areas with new indicators and visualizations.

Read More
New Report: Measuring and Mapping Neighborhood Opportunity for U.S. Children Report, Data Visualizations September 15, 2016

The Child Opportunity Index: Measuring and Mapping Neighborhood-based Opportunities for U.S. Children explores racial/ethnic inequities in children’s access to neighborhood opportunity in the 100 largest U.S. metro areas, with a focused look at how residential segregation affects these inequities. The report describes the construction, capabilities, and limitations of the Index, with guidance on how to interpret the associated maps and equity measures. It further provides examples of how organizations are using this tool to better understand and improve children’s neighborhood environments and outcomes. Read the report, use the interactive mapping tool to explore neighborhood opportunity in individual metro areas, download one-page snapshots for 25 metros, produce rankings tables, and explore interactive visualizations that summarize patterns of racial/ethnic inequities in access to neighborhood opportunity.

"Politics and inertia have conspired to create this lopsided geography of affordable housing - undercutting the region's best hope for racial and economic integration," finds a major Boston Globe article, "Boundaries to Hope."  Diversitydatakids.org's analysis forms the foundation of the article and its conclusions, using the Child Opportunity Index (COI) to show the distribution of subsidized housing in metro Boston across neighborhoods with different opportunity levels.

Read More

Comprehensive new indicators, rankings, maps and data visualizations allow users to compare the neighborhood environments of children by race/ethnicity, age, and poverty status along 19 socioeconomic, housing, and demographic dimensions in metropolitan areas and the 100 largest cities. 

Read More

The Child Opportunity Index toolkit now includes interactive bar graphs that allow you to choose multiple racial/ethnic groups and explore the distribution of the poor and non-poor child population living in neighborhoods of varying opportunity levels. Select from among the 100 largest U.S. metropolitan areas or view data for the 100 largest metropolitan areas combined.

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Leaders at every level recognize that workers should be able to take time from their jobs to care for their own health or family health issues. But policymakers and practitioners need tools to make their case to colleagues and the public, and to ensure access to paid leave for all working families, especially those who need it most. New family and medical leave indicators from diversitydatakids.org can equip leaders with critical data to inform strategies that increase equity and opportunity. 

In collaboration with PolicyLink and Family Values @ Work, we presented a webinar about these indicators and how they can advance cross-sector efforts towards health equity and workers’ economic security. Leaders and researchers at the intersection of public health and work-family policies discussed the importance of rigorous data on state-level access to family and medical leave. The conversation included eligibility and affordability gaps in access to leave, as well as collaborative action to improve access to healthy and equitable employment policies.

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CityLab: "12 Data Tools to Help Americans Climb the Economic Ladder" Media Coverage March 8, 2016

The Atlantic's CityLab featured the "How Affordable is Opportunity?" Tool in an article titled "12 Data Tools to Help Americans Climb the Economic Ladder" by Tanvi Misra. The article introduces the newly launched White House Opportunity Project and the tools currently available on the opportunity.census.gov website, and presents the opportunity-affordability story map for the Boston Metro Area.

Pinellas County, Florida Uses Child Opportunity Index User Engagement February 18, 2015

The Juvenile Welfare Board and the University of South Florida have combined forces to work on a cross-site demonstration project for the National Neighborhood Indicators Partnership, run by the Urban Institute and sponsored by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. They have worked with researchers at diversitydatakids.org to use Child Opportunity Index data for Pinellas County, Florida. They are using these data to explore the relative contributions of place, school, and individual/family variables on student absenteeism. This project hopes to demonstrate the utility of integrated data systems to look at how variables in these domains impact absenteeism, both total and chronic, and thus academic performance. Read their Policy Brief:  A Study of Student Absenteeism in Pinellas County here.

In many cities across the U.S., Black and Hispanic families are most likely to live in areas where opportunity is relatively expensive, while White and Asian families are most likely to live in areas where opportunity is relatively cheaper. View story maps that show how the geography of affordability, opportunity, and race come together in different U.S. metro areas, and that highlight the implications for equitable access to opportunity.

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FMLA Eligibility and Affordability for Working Parents Data Visualizations October 19, 2015

Family leave plays a vital role in children’s healthy development by allowing working parents time off to provide care after the birth or adoption of a child and when a child is sick. The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) guarantees job-protected unpaid leave to eligible workers to care for themselves or a family member in times of illness, birth or adoption. However, eligibility criteria exclude a large share of working parents from FMLA protections, particularly vulnerable minorities such as Hispanic workers. Moreover, the unpaid nature of FMLA leave may make it financially difficult for parents to take time off, especially for black, Hispanic and foreign-born working parents. Use interactive charts to explore differences in FMLA eligibility and affordability by race/ethnicity and nativity at the national level and for specific states.

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The Family and Medical Leave Act: Limited Affordability for Black and Hispanic Fathers Infographic October 16, 2015

The Family and Medical Leave Act provides job-protected, unpaid leave to eligible workers for a birth or adoption, for a worker's own serious illness, or to care for a seriously ill family member. Just over half of employed fathers are eligible under the FMLA, but only 43% are potentially able to afford unpaid leave and there are strong inequities for black and Hispanic fathers.

Leaders at every level recognize that a child’s well-being should not be determined by their zip code, but how can policymakers and practitioners take action to ensure healthy places for all? The Child Opportunity Index, developed in partnership between diversitydatakids.org and the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity, arms leaders with critical data to inform strategies that increase equity and opportunity.

The purpose of this webinar was to introduce the Child Opportunity Index and show how it can further cross-sector efforts towards child health equity. Leaders and researchers at the intersection of public health and community development can benefit from rigorous, neighborhood-level data to understand needs and target collaborative action. This webinar was hosted and moderated by PolicyLink and included speakers from diversitydatakids.org, the Build Healthy Places Network, and Boston Medical Center. 

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Explore Our New Indicators on "Linguistically Isolated" Children Data Release, Data Visualizations November 4, 2015

New indicators were added to the website, highlighting the importance of understanding children's linguistic diversity and relevant geographic concentration patterns. These indicators can be explored in maps or rankings reports, or through custom profiles for particular locations. Additional interactive graphs are available to further explore the data.

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The Child Opportunity Index Highlighted in the Heller Magazine Media Coverage June 16, 2015

The Heller Magazine, featuring articles about the Heller School for Social Policy and Management's alumni, faculty and researchers, has made the Child Opportunity Index its cover story in the Spring/Summer 2015 issue. Representatives from three different groups which are using the opportunity index tools and data in their work are interviewed for this article, and they discuss about the ways in which the index is providing a unique, comprehensive, holistic view of neighborhoods, helping to support and advance their work in communities within three different metropolitan areas (Chicago, New York and Boston).

Child Opportunity Index Tutorial Video Tutorial March 12, 2015

Are you looking for a quick lesson on the Child Opportunity Index tools? This short video tutorial teaches users how to access a Child Opportunity Map, interact with the various map features, overlay the child population by race and ethnicity, and interpret your map. 

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Colorado Public Radio Features the Child Opportunity Index Media Coverage May 6, 2015

CPR, Colorado's Public Radio, has featured the Child Opportunity Index on their website, in an article titled "Study: Half of Denver metro's Hispanic kids live in low-opportunity areas." Two of 100 largest U.S. metro areas are located in Colorado: Denver-Aurora-Broomfield and Colorado Springs. The article showcases Child Opportunity Index maps and presents statistics on minority children living in very low opportunity neighborhoods in each of the two metros.

Children in Double Jeopardy: Do children in U.S. metropolitan areas live in "double jeopardy" neighborhoods? Data-for-Action Fact Sheet March 11, 2014

Children’s development and health are shaped by the neighborhoods where they live, learn and play. Children are more vulnerable when they face “double jeopardy,” that is adverse neighborhood conditions coupled with a lack of protective resources, for example, high neighborhood poverty and limited availability of quality early educational opportunities. Data show high prevalence of “double jeopardy” among young black, Hispanic, and American Indian children.

The Child Opportunity Index (COI) includes a diverse array of tools to view and interpret the geography of opportunity for children in the 100 largest U.S. metropolitan areas. Users can view and manipulate maps, bar graphs, and rankings tables to understand not only the presence of opportunity in neighborhoods, but also the inequities in where children of varying racial/ethnic groups live in relation to opportunity. To complement these tools, diversitydatakids.org presents 1-page profiles of 25 US metro areas using COI maps, graphs and data to provide a brief snapshot condensed into a single page. Click "Read More" to view the list of available metro profiles. 

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WESA, Pittsburgh's NPR News Station, Features the Child Opportunity Index Media Coverage April 7, 2015

WESA, Pittsburgh's NPR News Station, has recently featured the Child Opportunity Index on their station's website, in an interview with Dr. Dolores Acevedo-Garcia, Project Director of diversitydatakids.org, and Erin Hardy, Research Director for the project. The article, titled "Study: Nearly Half of Pittsburgh's Black Children Live in 'Very Low Opportunity' Neighborhoods," gives a brief overview of the Index and highlights the most interesting related statistics for the Pittsburgh metro area, including neighborhoods which fare worse in terms of opportunities for children.

WBUR, Boston's NPR News Station, Features the Child Opportunity Index Media Coverage March 30, 2015

WBUR, a Boston-based NPR news station, featured data and analysis from the Child Opportunity Index in a recent article in its CommonHealth blog titled "Boston’s Health, By T Stop: Neighborhoods Near But ‘Health Worlds Apart’" written by Carey Goldberg. The article brings to light neighborhood-level health inequities in the Boston metropolitan area in both adults and children. The article explores research by Dr. Sandro Galea of Boston University School of Public Health, who offers health disparities data by T-stop. It also highlights diversitydatakids.org's Child Opportunity Index, which presents national data on the equitable distribution of child opportunity by metropolitan area. 

diversitydatakids.org researchers published "The Child Opportunity Index: Improving Collaboration Between Community Development & Public Health" in the November 2014 Special Issue of Health Affairs on Collaborating for Community Health. The article presents the Child Opportunity Index, a measure of relative opportunity across a metropolitan area calculated based on 19 indicators of Educational Opportunity, Health and Environmental Opportunity, and Social and Economic Opportunity. Project Director of diversitydatakids.org Dr. Dolores Acevedo-Garcia and coauthors developed this index, which can be used to gauge neighborhood-based opportunities conducive to healthy child development across the 100 largest U.S. metropolitan areas.

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Boston Globe Features Child Opportunity Index Media Coverage March 27, 2015

The Boston Globe featured data from the Child Opportunity Index titled "Boston ranks low in opportunity for Hispanic and black children." The data demonstrate severe inequities in child opportunity levels among black and Hispanic children in the Boston metropolitan area. In fact, Boston ranks as the worst metro in the country (of the 100 largest metros) for Hispanic children, of whom over 6 in 10 live in the metro area's lowest-opportunity neighborhoods. 

Quality Check: Do young children in U.S. metro areas live in neighborhoods with quality early childhood education? Data-for-Action Fact Sheet March 11, 2014

Quality early childhood education (ECE) helps kids to succeed. While consensus builds around the need to expand quality ECE for all children, one key factor—neighborhood availability—has received little attention. New data highlight a large existing infrastructure of neighborhood ECE upon which to build, but also show that we have a long way to go to achieve quality ECE for all children.

Leaders at every level recognize that a child’s well-being should not be determined by their zip code, but how can policymakers and practitioners take action to ensure healthy places for all? The Child Opportunity Index, developed in partnership between diversitydatakids.org and the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity, arms leaders with critical data to inform strategies that increase equity and opportunity.

The purpose of this webinar was to introduce the Child Opportunity Index and show how it can further cross-sector efforts towards child health equity. Leaders and researchers at the intersection of public health and community development can benefit from rigorous, neighborhood-level data to understand needs and target collaborative action. This webinar was hosted and moderated by PolicyLink and included speakers from diversitydatakids.org, the Build Healthy Places Network, and Boston Medical Center.

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Vox.com: "The enormous racial opportunity gap in America's metro areas" Media Coverage February 17, 2015

Vox.com featured the Child Opportunity Index in a recent article titled "The enormous racial opportunity gap in America's metro areas," written by German Lopez. The article features data from initial research published in the November 2014 special issue of Health Affairs. 

The Child Opportunity Index toolkit includes interactive bar graphs that allow you to choose multiple racial/ethnic groups and explore the distribution of the child population living in neighborhoods of varying opportunity levels. Select from among the 100 largest U.S. metropolitan areas or view data for the 100 largest metropolitan areas combined.

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CityLab: "Is Your Neighborhood Healthy for Children?" Media Coverage February 23, 2015

The Atlantic's CityLab featured the Child Opportunity Index maps and data in a recent article titled "Is Your Neighborhood Healthy for Children?" written by Tanvi Misra. The article features data from initial research published in the November 2014 special issue of Health Affairs, as well as Child Opportunity Maps for metropolitan Albany, Boston, New Orleans and McAllen, Texas.  

PBS NewsHour interviews diversitydatakids.org researchers on their recent Health Affairs article Interview December 16, 2014

“Can government policies correct race and ethnicity disparities in child health?” asks PBS NewsHour in a recent interview with Project Director of diversitydatakids.org Dr. Dolores Acevedo-Garcia and Policy Research Director Dr. Pamela Joshi. The interview focused on their study, “Integrating Racial/Ethnic Equity into Policy Assessments to Improve Child Health,” which was published in the December issue of Health Affairs.

Unequal Family Leave: Are working parents eligible, and can they afford it? Data-for-Action Fact Sheet October 14, 2015

Family leave is a valuable prescription for child health. The Family and Medical Leave Act is landmark legislation that guarantees unpaid leave to eligible employees to care for themselves or a family member in times of illness, birth or adoption. New data highlight limited FMLA eligibility for working parents leave by race/ethnicity, and show that unpaid leave granted under the FMLA is unaffordable, especially for Hispanic parents.

Children in Double Jeopardy: Do children in U.S. metropolitan areas live in "double jeopardy" neighborhoods? Data-for-Action Fact Sheet March 11, 2014

Children’s development and health are shaped by the neighborhoods where they live, learn and play. Children are more vulnerable when they face “double jeopardy,” that is adverse neighborhood conditions coupled with a lack of protective resources, for example, high neighborhood poverty and limited availability of quality early educational opportunities. Data show high prevalence of “double jeopardy” among young black, Hispanic, and American Indian children.

diversitydatakids.org researchers published “Integrating Racial/Ethnic Equity into Policy Assessments to Improve Child Health” in the December 2014 Theme Issue of Health Affairs on Child Health. The article presents a new framework to systematically assess policy effectiveness for reducing racial/ethnic inequities in child health and development. Policy Research Director of diversitydatakids.org Dr. Pamela Joshi and coauthors developed this framework, which integrates rigorous equity analysis methods into a traditional policy assessment approach.

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Good Shepherd Services uses Child Opportunity Index to Create Report on Geography of Opportunity in NYC User Engagement: Report December 4, 2014

Good Shepherd Services, a multi-service agency that works annually with nearly 30,000 youth and families through over 80 programs in under resourced New York City communities, recently used the Child Opportunity Index to create a report entitled “Expanding the Geography of Opportunity in New York City.” This document has been shared with policymakers, funders, and external stakeholders as well as internal staff. Good Shepherd Services says, “we appreciate the index because it allows us to frame our work in terms of structural issues of equity and to highlight the importance of developmentally-informed interventions.”

diversitydatakids.org researchers published "The Child Opportunity Index: Improving Collaboration Between Community Development & Public Health" in the November 2014 Special Issue of Health Affairs on Collaborating for Community Health. The article presents the Child Opportunity Index, a measure of relative opportunity across a metropolitan area calculated based on 19 indicators of Educational Opportunity, Health and Environmental Opportunity, and Social and Economic Opportunity. Project Director of diversitydatakids.org Dr. Dolores Acevedo-Garcia and coauthors developed this index, which can be used to gauge neighborhood-based opportunities conducive to healthy child development across the 100 largest U.S. metropolitan areas.

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PBS NewsHour interviews diversitydatakids.org researchers on their recent Health Affairs article Interview December 16, 2014

“Can government policies correct race and ethnicity disparities in child health?” asks PBS NewsHour in a recent interview with Project Director of diversitydatakids.org Dr. Dolores Acevedo-Garcia and Policy Research Director Dr. Pamela Joshi. The interview focused on their study, “Integrating Racial/Ethnic Equity into Policy Assessments to Improve Child Health,” which was published in the December issue of Health Affairs.

News Archive Past articles and updates from the diversitydatakids.org Spotlight May 30, 2017

Click here to see past articles and updates from the diversitydatakids.org Spotlight.

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diversitydatakids.org researchers published “Integrating Racial/Ethnic Equity into Policy Assessments to Improve Child Health” in the December 2014 Theme Issue of Health Affairs on Child Health. The article presents a new framework to systematically assess policy effectiveness for reducing racial/ethnic inequities in child health and development. Policy Research Director of diversitydatakids.org Dr. Pamela Joshi and coauthors developed this framework, which integrates rigorous equity analysis methods into a traditional policy assessment approach.

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Child Opportunity Index Rankings Tables November 3, 2014

New Child Opportunity Index indicators rank the 100 largest metro areas for kids by race/ethnicity. Explore the interactive rankings table to see which metropolitan areas exhibit the largest (or smallest) inequities in opportunity for children of different racial/ethnic backgrounds.