The following charts present indicator data on children ages 5 to 17 living in a linguistically isolated household. A linguistically isolated household is a home where no person aged 14 or older speaks only English, and no person aged 14 or older who speaks a language other than English speaks English “very well”. All household members are considered linguistically isolated, regardless of individual language status. Home language represents the non-English language the child speaks most often at home.

States, metros, cities or school districts can be ranked based on their rates of child linguistic isolation. Bars are color coded to highlight U.S. regional patterns in the rankings. Change the location type and home language group to see how the rankings and regional patterns differ depending on location type and child language group.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2008-2012 American Community Survey. 

It is important to understand both the size of the linguistically isolated child population (i.e. the overall number of children) and the “rate” of linguistic isolation among children in different language groups. While some places have large numbers and high rates of child linguistic isolation, in other places rates can be high for children in certain language groups, even if the numbers are small, identifying a high-need group of children within the community.  These patterns can be explored in the interactive visualization below. 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2008-2012 American Community Survey. 

Understanding more about the linguistically isolated child population in a community (and how it compares to the linguistically isolated children in other places) is crucial for evaluating needs, targeting services, and developing strategies. Use the tool below to evaluate the linguistic diversity (or lack of diversity) among linguistically isolated children in your location(s) on interest. Compare your areas of interest with other places across the U.S.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2008-2012 American Community Survey. 


Notes: “School District” refers to children living within the geographic boundaries of that school district, not students who attend schools in that district. Data presented in the three charts above are drawn from a survey and are therefore subject to sampling variability and should be compared with caution. For 90% confidence intervals, click here (for the first and second chart) and here (for the third chart).